Causes of Mucus in Stool

Mucus is a clammy, jelly-like material formed by assorted components of the body. Frequently it is transparent, while it can also look greenish, whitish, or yellow in color. Even though mucus is most frequently linked with the respiratory system, it can also be formed by the intestines. For this reason, it sometimes shows up noticeably in a person's stool.
| Thursday, June 16, 2011
The human body frequently exhibits indications when something is not okay. If there is a persistent problem in the digestive system, these indications or symptoms can show up as modifications in a person's bowel movements. Substances like mucus might abruptly begin appearing in the stool. While the reason may be harmless, it can also however, signify a health trouble that seeks attention. It's significant to be aware about how to distinguish between usual reasons of mucus in stool and reasons that might imply you need to see your doctor.

What is Mucus?

Mucus is a clammy, jelly-like material formed by assorted components of the body. Frequently it is transparent, while it can also look greenish, whitish, or yellow in color. Even though mucus is most frequently linked with the respiratory system, it can also be formed by the intestines. For this reason, it sometimes shows up noticeably in a person's stool.

Role of Mucus

Under usual conditions, the intestines generate mucus to preserve wetness in the colon's coating so as to keep it greasy. A minute quantity of this mucus can append itself to stool, and it may be noticeable in the stool when it is excreted from the body.

Causes of Mucus

Inflammatory states of the bowel, like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, can lead to abdominal pain and bloating in the stomach. Diarrhea is regular with these situations, though constipation can also take place. Additionally, blood could also be present in the stool as an outcome of continuing injury to the intestinal coating.

Related symptoms can take place with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome); nonetheless, given that it is not an inflammatory situation and the inside layer of the intestine stays undamaged; blood in the stool is unusual with this situation. When linked with a gastrointestinal contagion, mucus in the stool frequently convoys diarrhea and stomach cramping. Infected person may also notice blood in the stool followed by fever.

Conditions of the rectum and anus, for instance the anal crevices (slits or fissures), anal fistulas (irregular holes or tubes amid limbs or tissues), and rectal ulcers can also lead to presence of mucus in the stool. In these situations, the stool may look usual or could be blood-spattered. Soreness with passing stool may turn out to be prominent enough that you evade bowel movements, which can further bring about constipation and probable fecal impaction.

Amplified quantities of mucus in the stool or mucus in the stool followed by other symptoms can be a sign of a severe medical situation. Seek out urgent medical care (dial 911) if you notice a high fever or blood-spattered stool, or if you notice signs of dehydration like declined urination, murky urine, amplified thirst, exhaustion, and light-headedness.

Now, in the nonappearance of any of the above mentioned severe disorders, mucus in stool can be healed by consuming more water, taking herbal demulcents and additional food items that build up a soothing coating that calm down intestinal inner linings. Marshmallow and slippery elm are an instance of a demulcent.

Sicknesses caused attributable to parasites and bugs caused due to bacteria are an additional cause for mucus in stool. These are very frequently seen in combination with cramps in the lower stomach, diarrhea, and possible blood spots seen in stools.

Diagnosis

If you notice mucus in your stool and feel that it could be an indication of a larger health trouble, you must see your doctor. He can evaluate your medical history and conduct an inspection to decide if there is a requirement for additional examinations. Then he can assure you if the mucus is regular or give you a line of treatment if he diagnoses a fundamental medical situation.

If mucus in your stool is constant, particularly if it is followed by additional modifications in your bowel movements or high temperatures in the body, or if it deteriorates or leads you to distress, seek quick medical attention without delay.

   
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